Angmering Forums
Angmering Forums
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Chatter (Category)
 Chitchat Forum
 Gardening Tips
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic 
Page: of 3

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 29 Sep 2008 :  21:20:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As we now enter the Autumn/Winter stage of the year - what are your thoughts on having tips for the season posted on this site??

I am interested in all aspects of gardening, vegetable growing is my main interest. (Hence the compost name !!!!)

Just pulled out the last of my runner beans. Leave the roots in the ground as they will put back a lot of nitrogen in to the ground.
Saving beans for next year is a real money saver - however it is best to swap seeds with a neighbour/friend as growing your own is not always the best way to get good results - especially if growing in the same site.

Happy to give tips/advice to any questions you may have - do not know it all but will try my best.

neil
Forum Owner / Moderator

United Kingdom
2623 Posts

Posted - 29 Sep 2008 :  23:39:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice idea, compost. Have others got tips or questions?
Go to Top of Page

j4ckier
Junior Member

United Kingdom
20 Posts

Posted - 30 Sep 2008 :  13:52:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A question on Ivy! Its invading my house and garden from all angles! its relentless cutting it back,any ideas

thanks
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 30 Sep 2008 :  14:56:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
With Ivy the only real solution is to get the roots out. Cutting back does not get rid of it.

If it is "strangling" a tree, people often cut through the stalk around the trunk. Whilst this will kill off the growth above, it will only encourage the Ivy to sprout from the roots. Sorry, but digging is the answer.

Be careful if the Ivy has grown under tiles as pulling the shoots out can dislodge tiles.

If you have a thick growth of Ivy that you wish to cut back, it is best to wear a paper face mask as it can hold a lot of dust and dead material.

Hope this helps.
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 30 Sep 2008 :  23:31:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great idea compost. Always up to learning more gardening tips. I have a large Mandevilla vine that's outside just now, but needs to come in for the winter. Do you think I should bring it in as is, or should I prune it back? Also, I have a tortured Hazelnut in a large pot, that's going in the ground soon. Do you know if they take well to hard pruning each year? It will be in a restricted area.
Go to Top of Page

Voice of Reason
Advanced Member

United Kingdom
521 Posts

Posted - 01 Oct 2008 :  16:40:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I find Agent Orange works best on clearing ALL my plants.

VoR


Sorry!

The best solution I have found for ivy is to chop it back as close to the roots as possible then use a "sysemic weed killer" to kill the roots off. Trade strength "Round Up" is the best I've found so far but you may need to treat the roots a couple of times.

VoR


Still here and still on the green tea!
Go to Top of Page

j4ckier
Junior Member

United Kingdom
20 Posts

Posted - 01 Oct 2008 :  16:49:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thanks, looks like i have an interesting weekend of ivy removal planned! hope the weather sorts itself out :)
Go to Top of Page

neil
Forum Owner / Moderator

United Kingdom
2623 Posts

Posted - 01 Oct 2008 :  17:43:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If anyone is intent on making sloe gin I would suggest they gather their sloes pretty soon. There doesn't seem to be as many around this year. Quite a few that are on the bushes are shrivelled. Seems like a bad sloe year!

Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 01 Oct 2008 :  21:10:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lulu,

Mandevilla vines flower on current seasons growth, these should be pruned in early spring before the growing season starts. (cutting out old growth/wood)
As for the Hazlenut, how you prune depends on the age of the tree. For the first two years you prune to get the laterals you wish to keep cutting the rest away. Choosen laterals are then cut back to about a foot. Once the tree is in the ground you cut the tips of new shoots to encourage further branching.
A technique called "Brutting" is then used - we can cover this at the time, once the tree is established.

J4ckier

VOR has mentioned systemic weedkillers - an excellent product, I did not cover this as I personally shy away from such things. However, if you are to use this - it is best to leave some leaves on the plant as absorbtion is better. The plant will show signs of dieing quickly, however it may take around three weeks for the roots to be killed.
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 01 Oct 2008 :  22:45:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks compost. Pruning back the Mandevilla will work to my advantage then. I'll try some cuttings from the prunings. The Hazelnut is only 2 feet tall just now. It'll have room to grow approx. 6-8 feet. I won't have to worry for a while, but I'd like to keep on top of things, to keep the tree a nice shape.
Am intrigued with "brutting", I've never heard the term before.

Edited by - Lulu on 01 Oct 2008 22:46:53
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 02 Oct 2008 :  07:29:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lulu,

Please excuse my wording, I will try to explain it in simple terms - not very good with complicated words.

Once the tree is established, in late summer or very early autumn you snap all new, long, strong growths in half. Not all the way through just so they are broken and hang down. It is a bit unsightly.
In the sprig you wait until you see the small clusters of red flowers (female) These are different to the yellow ones that appear on the fruiting buds. You then cut back all shoots, including the snapped ones, to either the first bunch of catkins or female flowers. If a shoot does not have red flowers, only catkins - it is best to let them fade before cutting out completely.

As with all pruning you should aim for a goblet shaped tree. Remove old wood, and any branches that touch as they cross.

Hope this makes sense.
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 02 Oct 2008 :  15:48:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, it does, thanks, compost. What's the history of this "brutting"? Is it something that's been done for a long time, or a relatively new idea?
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 02 Oct 2008 :  18:28:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lulu,

I can only say that I remembered this technique from a book I read a few years ago. I remembered it because it was unusual, not seen it mentioned for other fruits. Can not remember the book or would get it for the collection. Have tried looking it up on the internet - most results show it a way of diagramming a family tree.

Sorry cannot shed more light on the matter.

Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 03 Oct 2008 :  00:17:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for trying compost.
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 04 Oct 2008 :  08:33:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For those that have vegetable plots, a few things to do this week -

Plant over wintering onions, these will be ready for lifting late June - early July.

Cover spare ground with a layer of manure, leave on top of the soil - the rain and earthworms will do the work for you. Just a quick fork over in the spring. If you can, place cardboard over the ground first, then the manure - this will supress weeds for most of the season - the cardboard will be rotted enough to turn in when forking in the spring.

Choose broad beans ready to plant direct in to the soil early next month - this will give you an earlier crop than those planted in the spring. They are less likely to suffer from blackfly as well.

Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 05 Oct 2008 :  00:24:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another question.... I have a Cox's Orange apple tree in a large container. It has dwarf root stock. I'd rather keep it in the pot than put it in the ground. What, and when, would you recommend to feed it, to help it produce fruit? There were a few blossoms this spring, but the few apples that developed, dropped off.
I was feeding it once a month with an all purpose fertilizer. Thanks
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 05 Oct 2008 :  16:43:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi,

I take it you have more than one tree - even though many fruit trees are claimed to be self-fertile this is rarely the case. A second tree would be really beneficial - unless there are fruit trees in gardens close to yours.
I always spray the blossom as the fruit sets with a hand held sprayer - one of those 99p ones is fine. Place it on fine mist and give the sets a once a week spray. This helps the fruit set and should give a better crop.
As we seem to get each year now, a strong wind during June adds to what was known as "June drop", not much we can do apart from giving the tree a bit of shelter.
If you can go up a size in the container - this would help.
Feeding should take place in the growing season. Potash is good for fruiting. Avoid overfeeding any tree.
Each winter top dress the tree - remove the top 1-2 inches of soil/compost and replace.
During the early spring I give my fruit trees a spray on the foliage with seaweed extract, two capfuls in a gallon of water. This can be repeated three weeks later. A root drench of the same can be applied during the year if required.
If you do repot, you should lift the tree (compost attached) rub away some of the compost/soil around the root ball and cut out any coarse roots. DO NOT cut away fiborous roots.
Does the tree have any discolouration of the leaves - this would indicate a shortness of certian elements.
Go to Top of Page

Tinklebelle
Average Member

United Kingdom
81 Posts

Posted - 05 Oct 2008 :  17:25:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Fuchsias - I have about a dozen lovely Fuchsias in large pots. Should I bring into the greenhouse our potted Fuchsias ? Although some may be hardy it would be good to have blooms as long as possible. Should I trim them back to make them more compact and take up less space ? This is a very interesting spot Compost so thank you. By the way, the monthly Angmering Horticultural Club meets this coming Tuesday at 7.30 pm in Manor Nurseries and the specialist subject is Clematis. Do come and join us - anybody who reads this.

Tinklebelle
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 05 Oct 2008 :  18:05:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi,

Fushias can be brought into the greenhouse and you should remove green tips and leaves. Although you should not water them during the winter - you do not want the soil/compost to dry out completely. In early spring you can repot the plants in to slightly smaller pots and then prune hard. This will encourage growth.
Hardy varieties can be deep planted in the garden, a layer of mulch will help protect from frost damage. Take cuttings to give insurance. In the spring new shoots will emerge from the ground - pruning of old wood can then take place.
I have pruned at this time of year without adverse affect - but would say that it is not without its dangers. (Light trimming for space saving would not hurt).
Feed in early spring with a high potash feed. (as the flowers appear)

Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 05 Oct 2008 :  21:22:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you for the info on my last question, compost. I now have another question. Annoying, aren't I!! LOL I want to grow English walnuts from seed. I assumed I would just plant the nut, but a friend said in the Mediteranean, they leave the nuts in the green casing, split the casing and then plant the whole thing in a pot. Something to do with the nut still being attached to something in the casing. Have you ever heard of this, and what method would you recommend? Thanks Lulu
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 06 Oct 2008 :  07:15:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi,

Seemed to have a problem with posting a reply, my last one did not make it onto the system?????

I have not tried to grow Walnuts so can not give personal experience, however I have looked at a number of sites and find that they give conflicting advice.
Some say take the husk off crack the shell and plant the nut enclosed. Others say plant with the husk on - with a split in the casing.

Logically I would say that the whole seed would need to be planted with a split in the husk and the shell. A seed pod, seed ball (what ever the correct term is for Walnuts) would need to be gathered from under it's parental tree - it would not be ready if still attached and growing.

Walnuts sold in the grocers are generally Persian Walnuts.
Sorry, you have stumped me.
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 06 Oct 2008 :  16:37:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's ok compost. I have access to both plain nuts and ones in the casing, so I will experiment.
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 07 Oct 2008 :  20:43:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have placed my scented geraniums in the greenhouse today, they do not tolerate frost well and something tells me that we may see some within the next couple of weeks. (air frost)
It would be a good idea to clean and check the greenhouse heater for the forthcoming season.
Wallflowers should be planted out now.
Sweetpeas (seeds) can now be planted in the greenhouse. Toilet rolls are a cheap alternative to root trainers.
Flower pots should be cleaned and stored away. Greenhouses should be washed down, inside and out. Any shading left should definitely be cleaned off - to make the most of the shorter days.
Turn the compost heap. If the mixture is to dry - sprinkle with water.
Never put the first cuttings from the lawn after a weed and feed application on the compost pile.

Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 18 Oct 2008 :  09:01:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Time to tidy the garden pond (if you have one). I tend to drain mine and clean the sides, rocks, pump and lights. Remember that if we get freezing weather, it is best to place a tennis ball or similar object in the water to avoid a complete freeze over. Fish need to breathe.
I use a pump attachment on an electric drill to make the emptying process quicker, these can be brought from local hardware shops for around 7. (Pump attachment, not the drill unfortunately).

Rake up leaves from the lawn, for some this is an ongoing task for a couple of weeks. If you have room, use the leaves to make a leaf mulch pile, either just pile them up in a homemade/shop brought composting bin - or place them in a black plastic rubbish bag (make a few holes in the bottom) and put them out the back of shed/greenhouse. This makes an excellent soil conditioner, however it does take a bit longer to produce than normal compost.

Tender plants should be put inside for the season.
Those plants that are in pots but too big to move, a covering/wrapping of horticultural fleece is effective.

Spring cabbage should be planted, I tend to start mine of in the greenhouse, potting them up for a few weeks before transplanting to the veg plot. A covering of fleece, or cover with cloches will deter hungry pigeons.
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 25 Oct 2008 :  22:05:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Now is a good time to prune back trees. Make an undercut on the chosen branch then top cut about an inch further out from the trunk, this will save the branch tearing the bark down the trunk and allowing infection in. Once the branch is down, cut the short stump off as close to the raised callous as possible.

Parsnips should be ready for pulling from the veg plot.
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 29 Oct 2008 :  20:58:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Not much of a veggie gardener, I'm more into flowers, but I now have a small veggie plot in my new place. I'd like to try some parsnips, but don't know when to plant. Do I do it now, or early in the spring? I've heard they have a nicer taste if they go through a frost or two. Is that true, or an old wives tale?
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 29 Oct 2008 :  21:57:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi,

Early spring is good, Parsnips need to be in the ground for 28 - 32 weeks. It is true that frost does sweeten the taste as the cold does something to the starch - However, I have been pulling my crop since August (they were small at that stage) and were sweet and tasted like a Parsnip should.
A good variety is "Tender and True".
Parsnips are a bit of a bu**er to germinate, once planted they can take a few weeks to show. I would plant more than you think you might use, it would not surprise me to have a 25% failure rate on the seeds.

Now is a good time to plant some garlic and over - wintering onions. Manor Nursery has a good selection.

Good luck
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 29 Oct 2008 :  23:30:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks compost. I'll try and get that variety. I hope it's not just an English one, as I'm in Canada. Long way away, but very similar climate.
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 30 Oct 2008 :  17:00:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi,

If you can not find Tender and True, any variety that offers good canker resistance will suffice. Soil should be deeply dug and stone free, do not put manure on the area to be used as this will lead to a lush green growth at the expense of good root. I do not water my Parsnips or Carrots as a rule, if they want water they have to go down to it themselves - having said that, if the season is particularly dry I will give them a good soak (actually a drenching) about every two weeks.
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 31 Oct 2008 :  10:03:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good to know, thanks compost!
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 14 Nov 2008 :  19:11:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Spring cabbage should be started in the greenhouse, those that have some already started and showing two good leaves - these can be planted out.

Now leaves have fallen from grape vines - the stems can now be cut back. I cut mine back to about a third of the last seasons growth.

Stop, slow down on the feeding of fish - several ponds in gardens that I tend have been feeding as normal. It is not practice to feed fish through the winter months.

Stay off lawns as much as possible.
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 16 Nov 2008 :  01:32:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When you say planted out, do you mean outside, or just into bigger containers??
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 16 Nov 2008 :  08:26:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi,

Bit of both really, if the weather is mild as it is here at the moment - then outside is fine.
Some people like to pot on a stage - especially if weather is cold.
When you do plant out, make sure that the ground is compacted - cabbages will not set heart if the ground is to free.
Either way is fine - I have some young ones in the ground and some in the greenhouse (bit of insurance really).

Hope the weather is fine in Canada
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 16 Nov 2008 :  20:37:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks compost. I believe our weather is mirroring yours at the moment. It's cold, but not too cold, but very wet. Haven't had a real hard frost yet. Have you?
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 19 Nov 2008 :  20:40:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Turf can still be laid - either for a new lawn or patching an existing one. Make sure the ground is compacted with just a fine tilth over the top for the roots to take into.

Weather is going to be bad from Friday - both windy and very cold (wind chill will make it feel several degrees below, Northerly wind). Make sure all items are secure and that tender plants are taken in or covered.

Continue to rake up leaves, clear those that have fallen into a pond if you have one. (causes toxic gases to build up in the water).

Lulu,
No real hard frost as yet - had a few days when the ground was a bit white. Seems it is you and me keeping this topic active - thought we would have had plenty of useful tips coming in as there are some lovely gardens in and around the village - plenty of locals are doing a lot right. We all have unusual ways with gardening and would be nice to hear some oddities. (such as always place a banana under a new rose, feeds the plant for a season. Lightly squash the fruit splitting the skin prior to planting)
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 21 Nov 2008 :  21:26:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Never heard of the banana trick, compost, but I'll try it. Do you think it would work in a large potted rose? The deer around here are famous for eating all the roses, so I'd have to pot it up and keep it on the deck.
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 22 Nov 2008 :  18:54:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi,

Yes the banana would work in a pot - it is a good source of potassium and other elements for the rose. You will notice that the colour of the flowers is more intense.

Another odd tip - put the contents of the Hoover bag on top of the compost that Tomato's are growing in. Lightly turn in and water - there are so many trace elements in the dust/felt that it really does feed the crop. Try it on one plant and compare with the rest of the crop.
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 04 Dec 2008 :  20:06:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Try to open the greenhouse for a short while each day, air circulation helps prevent a host of diseases and deters a few bugs.

Spring bulbs can still be planted, I tend to plant my Tulips a bit deeper than the packs recommend.

Lightly turn over any bare areas of soil, this helps keep weeds down and gives birds a chance to pick up some of the grubs that are lurking beneath the surface.
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 06 Dec 2008 :  22:49:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The weather here has been very mild, for the time of year, and a lot of the bulbs I planted for spring are growing like crazy. I know the bulbs will be fine, but how will this affect the blooming time? I don't want the flowers in January, which is what it looks like being just now. I know if we have some good hard frosts, it will slow things down some, but how can I make sure the bulbs don't bloom too soon??
Go to Top of Page

compost
Advanced Member

265 Posts

Posted - 08 Dec 2008 :  16:48:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi,

I am going to ask my sources of all wisdom (Ferring Nursery & Manor Nursery) on this one. I would say that light exclusion would slow things down, horticultural fleece between some stakes to cast shade. Would not cover the plants as added warmth would only encourage more growth. Will post an answer when had chance to ask them. Bit different from the old problem of trying to bring them on.
I do like the earlier showing, as not all come to flower at once and a longer flowering period is covered.
What bulbs are they?
Go to Top of Page

Lulu
Advanced Member

337 Posts

Posted - 08 Dec 2008 :  23:26:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Have bulb iris', lots of crocus, muscari, hyacinths, daffodils and tulips. Have to keep the tulips on the deck, because of the deer. Most of the pots are layered with a mixture of bulbs, so I'm hoping I should have a longer flowering period.

Edited by - Lulu on 08 Dec 2008 23:27:04
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 3 Previous Topic Topic   
Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Angmering Forums © Neil Rogers-Davis, 2006 - present Go To Top Of Page
Snitz Forums 2000